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Revaria

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Revaria last won the day on July 2

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About Revaria

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    Advanced Member

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    New York
  • Inverts You Keep
    Amanos
    Black Crystals
    Bloody Marys
    Red Cherries
    Cherax (Blue Moon)
    Red Crystals

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  1. Revaria

    Soothing Shrimp

    I thought it was just the weather that was why the site was quiet, a lot of people stop shrimping and fish keeping over the summer. Its the worst time of the year for stores I heard.
  2. Yeah I agree with wyzazz a floodlight would definitely work well for most plants if its lighting over a small area. There are several videos on youtube comparing flood lights to regular lights, Joey from the king of DIY made one a while back comparing it to the kessil and I also think Cory from aquarium coop did a video with just the floodlight as well.
  3. Revaria

    Neo Culls

    pm'd
  4. Revaria

    Cherax Sp from Papua

    I don't think anyone is selling cherax species here on the forum, most people only sell the mexican dwarf and the clarkii species. If you want to try to purchase some you can try to get them from Shrimpfever as they had them in stock a few months ago when I went there in person; the owner Tommy ships them into the states quite frequently.
  5. Revaria

    Cholla wood from E-bay

    If you really want to go about making sure it is parasite free, you can boil the wood for 10-20 minutes and then you can place it in quarantine for a week in a separate tank and just observe the wood to see if anything grows. Afterwards you can put it in your tank if you believe it is safe. You may lose a decent amount of tannins through this method, but it ensure the wood is sterilized.
  6. Revaria

    Feeding without copper

    Sounds good, eventually you can start soaking some food in the water of the blood worms for a few minutes prior to feeding to give them the scent/ flavor of the bloodworms and the cory may try out the food as well; if it works eventually you can just stop soaking and feed the flakes normally. And a blood worm flat pack is pretty large, but some of us go through them pretty fast if you have a lot of tanks; in addition a lot of those blood worms is just ice/water weight.
  7. Revaria

    Feeding without copper

    Well from my experience blood worms are generally very healthy for fish and barely any fish will reject them, so you can guarantee your fish is eating as long as they will probably go crazy over bloodworms. Another idea would be to place your cory in a separate tank, feed them flake food, or your other main food of choice until they get used to that as their main meal then re-add them to the main aquarium, you can also add other corys to your tank which will allow them to compete with each other for food making them more active, and if 1 cory eats the food it will cause the other corys to start accepting that food as well. And I just want to make sure that you are talking about the Julii Corydora correct?
  8. Yeah ideally you would want to do that, and maybe add almond leaves and moss to your water storage area for a few days or weeks to lower the pH to your liking prior to the water change, but I don't have the space for that so I have to deal with the cards I got.
  9. I was regarding canister filters in those aspects where you can bag peat moss/ sphagnum moss or crushed coral to change the pH over time instead of just leaving them there within the tank, it can also be done with almond leaves for tannins as well if you do not want to deal with the debris from the leaves.
  10. Revaria

    Feeding without copper

    It depends how high quality do you want to go and what are you looking for the food to do to the fish as foods can induce breeding, bring out color or for general nutrition? Bloodworms make a fine meal for fish, cories and shrimp, so does repashy as it will sink allowing your fish to just pick at it and both are high quality and expensive in the long run. Currently I feed my fish kens vegetable flake, and a protein flake, the breeders get brine shrimp, daphnia and bloodworms as well, while my otos get repashy and my shrimp and snails get regular fish flakes and mixed frozen vegetables or canned. For me selecting good foods is about getting that mix of vegetables and protein in addition to a high quality ingredient list. On the ingredient lists my favorite things to see are insect meal (or any insects the current trend is black soldier fly), various vegetables (carrot, peas, alfalfa, etc), spirulina, brine shrimp, blood worms, whole fish/shrimp/krill meals. I also try to keep my ingredients lists short, and to avoid certain foods that contain a lot of corn, potato starch and sometimes wheat (sometimes cause I believe all floating pellets use wheat) and free from certain preservatives that may be potentially toxic if possible. If you are asking for specific foods I recommend, I recommend golden pearls as they have a high amount of brine shrimp in them, repashy as its high quality, new life spectrum foods for the same reason, sera o nip and sera spirulina tabs if you have a lot of fish, fluvals new bug bites and I have heard good things about the new northfin foods. In general a good rule of thumb is to replace fish food every few months as it is food and food does spoil; I try to keep mine in air tight lids, shielded from light and moisture and that as long as your fish and shrimp are breeding that means they are happy regardless of what you are feeding them. Finally no matter how good the fish food is if the fish refuse to eat it, then its automatically no good. Some fish refuse pellets, while others refuse flake and mostly eat live foods; if you have too, you may have to train your fish to eat the food and if you can't, just feed it to the shrimp and snails as they will literally eat anything.
  11. Revaria

    What Happened here?

    Yeah, what Devin said is most likely what happened, I'll just add that rotting plants could have also a breeding grounds for the scuds allowing their population to grow and eventually outcompete the cherry shrimp, but if this occurred rapidly most likely its the ammonia.
  12. Revaria

    Lost the whole tank...

    Sorry to hear that, I hope you have a easy time resetting the tank if you choose to do so.
  13. Well regarding the basics, plants need a few things to grow, light, CO2 and nutrients. As long as they are getting all of those in sufficient amounts they should grow. The max speed at which a plant grows depends on the species of plant in relation to the amounts of nutrients it can receive. Then it depends on how your specific plant feeds, for root feeders flow would matter less as most nutrients, would be coming in from their roots, but they need fresh CO2 to be brought to them, for water column feeders flow is more important as that is where their source of nutrients get to them. In regards to filtration, different filters can provide different results depending on what you want them to do, they can clarify water, aerate the water, provide a area for UV sterilization, a area for pH modification etc. They also house the bacteria which can convert ammonia to nitrite then to nitrates. The book probably refers to the conversion of ammonia to nitrites and nitrate part, as ammonia is the preferred food for plants. It is also extremely toxic to fish and shrimp at neutral pH and higher. Plants, however can utilize nitrates and nitrites as well and they do as nitrates are utilized in most fertilizers. In regards to safety, having a good filter with lots of bacteria can prevent ammonia levels from skyrocketing by providing housing basically for all the bacteria within the bio rings, sponges etc and helps them grow by bringing flow and nutrients to them. The filter will also provide some mechanical filtration to clear up the water and the flow will remove some dead zones. Judging from your bioload you can remove the filter and have a bubbler, simply because shrimp and snails unless in high numbers do not produce much waste at all in comparison to fish. You may cause a bacteria bloom in the process as you are going to be removing most probable source of major bacteria within your aquarium, depending on the amount of nutrients in the water, but it will either balance out in time or the plants will take care of it. Either way most likely your tank will be fine as you have a low bioload to begin with and you are using fertilizers in the tank, which should mitigate most of if not all the issues from the filter. In my opinion filters of any kind are always better for the aquarium inhabitants, the tanks are just so much more stable, they can house more fish and the water quality is better as well. They are by no means necessary as I do run tanks with nothing in them, but there are so many simple issues within tanks that can be avoided by using a filter.
  14. Revaria

    Looking For Help Identifying What I'm Doing Wrong

    You may have different tap water parameters than us, if your water naturally has nitrates and other fertilizers that is blessing for plants, as you don't have to add anything to your tanks. Everyone has their own style which helps them succeed in my cases to keep most of my plants and invertebrates added components are required as my water comes out at a TDS of 40, very low gh, very low kh and no fertilizers which is a guarantee death sentence for most of the plants I kept and invertebrates I keep. Granted however my water is perfect for breeding tropical fish which is pretty swell for me.
  15. Revaria

    More missing shrimp

    Aotf makes a very valid point in that a lot of fish stores buy shrimp from oversea areas. The thing is that shrimp can generally tolerate major water changes about once a month for the most part depending on how old they are and whether they are berried. The general rule is the younger the shrimp the better it will adapt. In my experience/ belief once a shrimp enters a major different water parameter it will generally molt, if the shrimp is fresh from overseas it would have molted at the pet store and if it transitioned properly it would still be alive. This causes an issue because once you place that same shrimp within your tank it is too early to molt again and the shrimp will die, not sure if everyone believes in this being the case on why shrimp do poorly from store to our homes, but it is my belief. Like Aotf said generally they don't do well once placed in our tanks. I stopped buying from my local fish stores after having so many deaths and now rely mostly on breeders from this site or on the internet.
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