Jump to content
Wakspiddlevak

[WTB] Tap water acclimated Caridina cantonensis shrimp

Recommended Posts

 I doubt you'll find many here keeping their caridinas in tap water. I'd probably look for low grade CRS if I were to experiment here. Just have to acclimate them to these parameters yourself. Get more than you think you'll need. lol

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I have 27 Tangerine tigers living in Neo waters. Around 270 tds along with my blue dreams.

I started with 10 tigers at first, acclimated them for 24+ hrs on drip and then did the same for the rest. Caridinas can live in neo waters 200-300 tds; you just have to spend the time to acclimate them. 

I am low on tank space, that is why I am putting cardinas with my neos

Oh btw... I also have 11 stardust shrimp in the tank as well. For they dont breed with other caridinas. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Shrimp Life said:

I would advise against this, I think there might be a few that will reproduce in Neo tanks but majority of caridina will NOT thrive or have a high baby survival. 

What if I change the water parameters to Caridina (100-150 tds) and have neos living in it? Would that be a better option? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Shrimp Life said:

I would advise against this, I think there might be a few that will reproduce in Neo tanks but majority of caridina will NOT thrive or have a high baby survival. 

 

Sorry to tell you that people are already doing it and the Caridina shrimp are infact thriving and breeding. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Saddleback Shrimp said:

What if I change the water parameters to Caridina (100-150 tds) and have neos living in it? Would that be a better option? 

 

A better question for him might be:

 

> What brand of active substrate do you sell for $4 per pound?

 

If you catch my drift. Lol 😂 

 

The naysayers don't want Caridina shrimp adapting to tap water because they won't be able to sell their overpriced fancy dirt or magic shrimp potions, AND the prices of shrimp will go down. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I'll say is that it's your money, your tank, your shrimp, and your hobby, so if you want to try to have all your Caridina adapted to tap water no one can stop you from doing it. The fun of this hobby, imo, is that it's still a relatively new hobby and we're still learning so much about shrimps and their husbandry. I have tons of ideas I want to try once I have the tank space to do so. 

 

One suggestion that I thought of is that you can either start a tank with water parameters that resemble those of the breeder you get them from to properly acclimate them and reduce the initial stress from acclimating to a new tank and/or shipping. At each water change you can take out like 10% or 15% of the water and exchange it with tap water, so each time you're doing a water change you're doing a sort of slow acclimation to your tap water without a major sudden change in parameters. This may provide the least amount of stress on the shrimp and give them a better chance to adapt to your tap water over time. Just a suggestion as I feel that might give you more success than doing a single drip acclimation, and because it might be hard to find breeders who sell Caridina shrimps adapted to tap/hard water aside from the tiger shrimp species. 

 

Personally, I keep my shrimp in the parameters that're recommended for the given species/type of shrimp because I want maximum breeding (I don't have any fish in any of my shrimp tanks, I use RO remineralized water, feed shrimp-specific foods, etc.). Through several years of success, failures, and watching other people's successes and failures I feel I've learned enough to be able to successfully breed many different types of shrimps, but nothing is every 100% effective, which is most evident by seeing how different successful breeders maintain their shrimp tanks. Even though there may be a lot of similarities and differences between their methods, they may both be equally successful in keeping/breeding shrimp. So I'm not going to say that I'm an expert (far from it imo), but I like to give my opinions based on my experience and anyone who reads it can take it or leave it. Ultimately, it's your hobby and I wish you success! A more hardy Caridina shrimp that's cheaper and easily accessible will only help to encourage the growth of the hobby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Wakspiddlevak said:

 

A better question for him might be:

 

> What brand of active substrate do you sell for $4 per pound?

 

If you catch my drift. Lol 😂 

 

The naysayers don't want Caridina shrimp adapting to tap water because they won't be able to sell their overpriced fancy dirt or magic shrimp potions, AND the prices of shrimp will go down. 

 

Thanks Jsak. Insightful and makes sense every hobbyist wants the best for their different species of shrimp. 

 

From your experience, if we do have Neocaridinia with Caridinas in the same tank, is it better to keep TDS low (100-150)

or high (150-250) for both species to thrive? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Saddleback Shrimp Thanks! I feel that people are less likely to listen to you if you're firm in saying things like "it has to be this way" so I try to offer any advice that can fit in with what the person asking wants, or based on what their goals are. Ultimately, some people might just want shrimp to add to their aquascaped tank with fish because they're cool, colorful and unique so they're goal is to keep them alive over breeding, but if they wanted breeding over anything else I'd suggest not keeping them with any fish at all. But all we can do on forums like this is to offer friendly advice so it's up to each person to decide if they want to take it or go with another method.

 

I've never tried keeping them together, but in my experience neos are much hardier and more adaptable, so I'd suspect that leaning towards lower TDS and Caridina parameters would give you the best shot. You may lose neos initially, and they may not breed for a while because they'll have to adapt, but I can't say that it's impossible to breed both together. If you can manage a slow acclimation process I'd think the shrimp would have a better chance. I'd suggest starting with a low grade RCS or just a RCS in general since they're the shrimp that's been in the hobby longest and should have the most stable genetics. Also, getting them from a reputable source means you'll be getting as healthy of shrimp that you possibly can so that they have a better chance of acclimating. The biggest thing I've learned, and what I still struggle with sometimes, is patience in this hobby. If you're able to take the time to acclimate and not rush them into adapting you'll most likely have a better chance of success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I've heard the tiger species seem to be the most hardy and adaptable of the Caridina species. Until recently I thought that OERBTs/OEBTs needed really hard water to thrive, but I've heard of reputable sellers/breeders keeping them in Caridina parameters with little or no KH. I've also heard that aura blues and tangerines thrive better with some KH in their water, but I have both species in purely Caridina/soft water with little to no KH and they're breeding. I can't say for certain how well they adapt to hard water, but from hearing the wider ranges of parameters that people have successfully kept and bred them in, I'd say tigers would be best to start with if you're trying to get a Caridina species in hard water conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Saddleback Shrimp said:

Would you say, tangerine tigers and aura blue tigers more adaptable to hard water? 

Yes, I keep both my Tangerines and my Aura Blues in 200TDS, gH 8-9, kH 4-5 pH 7.2-7.4.  Actually, I keep almost all of my "Tiger" shrimp in Neo Parameters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks 🙏🏼 for all the great insight and advice. @JSak @wyzazz 

I can sleep better now. 😅

I am just a couple of months into this hobby and I am still learning a lot. Really enjoying raising the shrimps and seeing  them grow. 

What do you guys do with your surplus of shrimp when your tank is full? 

I have heard people selling them on Craigslist and Ebay. Your thoughts? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Saddleback Shrimp said:

Thanks 🙏🏼 for all the great insight and advice. @JSak @wyzazz 

I can sleep better now. 😅

I am just a couple of months into this hobby and I am still learning a lot. Really enjoying raising the shrimps and seeing  them grow. 

What do you guys do with your surplus of shrimp when your tank is full? 

I have heard people selling them on Craigslist and Ebay. Your thoughts? 

 

I sell them of course!  If you're in the market for Tangerine Tigers let me know, I have a ton of them right now!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup! It's understandable especially when you're just getting into the hobby that people won't be able to commit to getting a whole RO/DI system or have enough money to get a huge setup. I'd guess that most of the experienced keepers/breeders became so knowledgeable through learning from their mistakes. Personally, I feel you can learn a lot more from your failures than your successes, and with shrimp I'd expect failures every now and then, so it's important not to get too defeated if something were to happen as long as you learn from it. I've been in the hobby for several years now and I still feel like I'm learning new things.

 

Like wyzazz said selling or giving your extra shrimp away would probably be the recommendation from most breeders. I'm not at the point where I have that many shrimp to sell, but I do plan to in the future, more so to sustain my hobby, spread the hobby, and meet other people who're as into shrimp as I am 😆 another option is to see if your local fish store might buy them from you or maybe give you store credit in exchange for them. Selling online seems like it may be difficult at first because you'll need to build up a reputation because naturally people will compare your product and ratings to another seller who's been selling for a while. For the average hobbyist I'd recommend sticking locally if you're just looking to get rid of your excess shrimp through local clubs, fish stores, friends, etc. because it sounds like the shipping process especially can be very tricky to deal with. For example, I don't plan to sell online because the process of shipping seems to have a pretty difficult learning curve so I'm planning to just sell locally. Glad to help! It can be a pretty challenging hobby at first because they're fairly different than fish, but I think that makes it feel even more rewarding when you figure it all out and get colonies of shrimps going at a time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...