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Florida Issues Call for Anglers to Target Exotics

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I know they've been doing or attempting to do similar things with lionfish and pythons etc so I'm not too surprised. It stinks but if they're hurting or decimating native creatures then I understand. Is definitely a bit odd though with an app and prizes!  

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I think aquarium owners in FL headed to the lake after seeing a picture of that fish.

 

Florida just has the problem that it is Florida. Warm and wet, an awful lot of new things would love to live there.

Pythons are eating all the larger native wild life and crazy hard to find and catch.

Pigs.. well here I think the solution is to send Ted Nugent + some butchers and sausage makers/BBQ nuts down there and fix the issue. Mmmm delicious problem.

Walking catfish? They fixed that right? When they blew them up the piranha?

Snakeheads, why did it have to be snakeheads?

Giant snails eating all the stucco. See this stucco, that is how you get snails. FL is why I can't have a tank with  monster snails in it.

Lion fish. After they escaped into the ocean from the world's worst thought out petting zoo, they started to reproduce like crazy. The fact they are ravenous predators probably doesn't help.

I wonder if there are lakes or ponds down there with bettas in them?

An awful lot of exotic fish are just one "Hey wouldn't it be neat if these lived in that lake/pond/river/swamp?!" or "These are so expensive, if they bred here they would be WAY cheaper!" from thriving down there at the expense of whatever food chain they wreck. Goliath tiger fish? Awesome!!!

If someone brings back dinosaurs, they will get loose in FL.

 

We need more cool invasive species in MN (we might have weather loaches!) that are introduced without forethought.

Lets see.. How about bull sharks?

Will live in fresh water? Check!

Found as far north as Chicago? Check!

Will eat all the invasive carp in the Mississippi river? Check!

Nothing can possibly go wrong! We have solved the invasive carp problem!

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After watching every episode of river monsters and hearing about bull sharks being over a thousand miles inland up the missisipi I am no longer as brave in the water here lol! I used to be confident nothing was there that could do any damage. 

 

 It insane all the things that have been introduced on purpose like the carp in the US and cane toads in Australia. I guess we might want to release lions and tigers to deal with those pesky hogs! 

I think I recall another  reason for the issues down around Miami is the international airport and smuggled animals being let loose out of stupidity/fear. I don't even want to Google but I know there's huge parrot populations, iguanas and has been small groups of breeding monkeys.  Even in New York there's thousands of quaker parrots flourishing!

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45 minutes ago, heatherbee said:

After watching every episode of river monsters and hearing about bull sharks being over a thousand miles inland up the missisipi I am no longer as brave in the water here lol! I used to be confident nothing was there that could do any damage. 

 

 It insane all the things that have been introduced on purpose like the carp in the US and cane toads in Australia. I guess we might want to release lions and tigers to deal with those pesky hogs! 

I think I recall another  reason for the issues down around Miami is the international airport and smuggled animals being let loose out of stupidity/fear. I don't even want to Google but I know there's huge parrot populations, iguanas and has been small groups of breeding monkeys.  Even in New York there's thousands of quaker parrots flourishing!

The problem with MIA is the customs facilities at the airport that holds animal shipments. In the 70's-80's they would release the animals at the airport if no one claimed them. The banded Eurasian dove is great example. They released about 100 of them and less than 30 years they have made it as far as CO and Utah. Now they are displacing the native morning dove by dominance and interbreeding. One of the advantages for this dove is the ability to survive all winter and not needing to migrate like the morning dove..

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I mightve heard that about the 70s and 80s and just don't recall. I watch so many nature and documentary shows that I am constantly surprised at what I learn especially about history before my time. Slightly random but I am looking forward to the mourning doves coming back soon. We had large amounts around us last year. I'm a bird watcher among a million other animal related hobbies and they have a unique call! 

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The canal I live on in Miami has a few non natives, you can find Oscars, Cichlids and I imagine other species that were illegally released. This contest may be the reason there an increasing amount of boats up and down all day fishing in the canal.

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15 minutes ago, r45t4m4n said:

The canal I live on in Miami has a few non natives, you can find Oscars, Cichlids and I imagine other species that were illegally released. This contest may be the reason there an increasing amount of boats up and down all day fishing in the canal.

I'm totally against releasing any non-native's but man would I love to fish those canals. Would bring me back to the days when I use to fish/collect in the Amazon all the time.

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Well if people didnt dump exotic animals in the waterways it wouldnt be a problem.

 

Quote

A very popular aquarium fish known for its brilliant colours and long fins that have been developed through selective breeding in captivity. In the wild, Siamese Fighting Fish are a dull greenish, to brown or grey, and have relatively short fins. They are surface air breathers, and have a specialised labyrinth organ which allows them to gulp air from the surface. Surface air breathing helps Siamese Fighting Fish survive in waters that are low in dissolved oxygen. 

The species was discovered in large numbers in Fogg Dam in the Northern Territory in January 2014. Although native to Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia in Southeast Asia, introduced Siamese Fighting Fish are established in the wild in some parts of the world.

Siamese Fighting Fish may pose a significant threat to native fishes, frogs and other native species in these wetlands - through competition, predation and the introduction of diseases.

http://fishesofaustralia.net.au/home/species/4919/

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