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Shrimplet survival rate


Wygglz
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Okay Experts, I have another newbie question. I've read post about baby survival rates and I think this is an important topic of course. My question is this. I just found babies in one of my tanks this weekend. Now these are my first that I've seen (very excited) but they are literally the size of a grain of sand. How do you guys know how many you have to start and what your survival rate is? I have shrimp in with plants, rocks, sand, cholla, and am lucky to see anything that tiny. I was only searching because my records said that I had females with eggs about ready.

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Neos baby survival rate is pretty common most likely they will survive since neos are hardy and stuff but when people talk about low baby survival rates usually it is towards taiwan bees and cardinia species of shrimp

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Well that was a guesstimate about how many eggs a female has and for the first week or so you may find some babies other babies may be hiding also shrimp daddy has an article about the baby stages. Some of your baby shrimp may not reach some of the stages they meet later on so that's why people don't see as many babies as there are as many eggs

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Congratulations on your shrimplets! Unfortunately there isn't a 100% accurate method in counting how many eggs or shrimplets hatch. Most people guesstimate the amount of eggs based on research and experience. Sometimes my new female berried shrimp carry very few eggs and even fewer make it to shrimplets. My more mature females seem to carry 20-30 eggs based on the size of their clutch.

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Myself and few breeders around the world created this article: http://www.shrimpydaddy.com/pages/how-to-analyse-low-shrimplet-survival-rate

 

Shrimpy Daddy

your article is correct, my only objection is to the substrate.

You wrote:

his is achieve by having proper substrate design (at least 8cm thick and use porous material)

In all my shrimp tanks substrate is 2-3 cm , why you propose 8cm?

 

And you dont say anything for co2, ιn your article . :) 

I've noticed in most shrimps , that affects the co2 the small shrimps .

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For the substrate, the key factor to the design is to be able to trap waste material and decompose properly. I put the thickness there is for easy reference and follow. No doubt thinner substrate may work, but it will have to be designed and maintained properly. Good feedback. Maybe I will modify the verbiage.

Regarding CO2, that is very tricky. I know both you and I are injecting CO2 into our shrimp tank. But due to bubble counter is not a standard, it is very hard to say how many BPS will kill shrimp baby. Hmm... Maybe I can put something like over-dosing CO2. I don't wish people have a false impression of CO2 is 100% shrimp-safe. End up their shrimp dies, and I will be flamed again. ^_^"

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For the substrate, the key factor to the design is to be able to trap waste material and decompose properly. I put the thickness there is for easy reference and follow. No doubt thinner substrate may work, but it will have to be designed and maintained properly. Good feedback. Maybe I will modify the verbiage.

Regarding CO2, that is very tricky. I know both you and I are injecting CO2 into our shrimp tank. But due to bubble counter is not a standard, it is very hard to say how many BPS will kill shrimp baby. Hmm... Maybe I can put something like over-dosing CO2. I don't wish people have a false impression of CO2 is 100% shrimp-safe. End up their shrimp dies, and I will be flamed again. ^_^"

 

For co2 you cant tell how much is the safe zone, you must meter and watch the grown of  plants and shrimps.

Yes bubbles is not stantard.

But just a litle adding of co2 , you can grow healty plants with a dificult shrimps.

Its the same wiht ferts. :)

For the substrate i prefer 2-3 cm , for cleaning easily , in this way the ph dont drop a lot.

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What are the benefits of using CO2?

 

Just for plants. LOL!!!

 

Don't attempt. ;)

 

You will need to control lighting, CO2, feeding and ferts. If you are not experience in planted tank, having a high-tech planted shrimp tank can be a tricky act. You just reminded me something. Having a lot of floating plants can be tricky on ferts/ nutrients control too. Floating plant has unlimited supply of CO2, which is similar to injecting CO2.

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Prior to me diving into keeping and breeding shrimp, I was an aquascaper. I kept high tech planted aquariums and loved it. The delicate balance between the three: Lighting, Fertilizers, and CO2 can be quite tricky, so I certainly won't be attempting with my shrimp but wanted to know the benefits.

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Prior to me diving into keeping and breeding shrimp, I was an aquascaper. I kept high tech planted aquariums and loved it. The delicate balance between the three: Lighting, Fertilizers, and CO2 can be quite tricky, so I certainly won't be attempting with my shrimp but wanted to know the benefits.

 

Yeah, the balancing act is too much for most people. Which is why I will not recommend people to do it, unless they really know how and they have a lot of time to observe the tank everyday. ;)

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Just for plants. LOL!!!

 

Don't attempt. ;)

 

You will need to control lighting, CO2, feeding and ferts. If you are not experience in planted tank, having a high-tech planted shrimp tank can be a tricky act. You just reminded me something. Having a lot of floating plants can be tricky on ferts/ nutrients control too. Floating plant has unlimited supply of CO2, which is similar to injecting CO2.

You are scaring people... :P

It depend from the light the co2 and the ferts.

But just a litle bit, say drop ph 0.2 its a big help for the plants.

Yes floating plants help for cleaning the water.

And some plants that can grow out of the water and take co2 from air , like  Hygrophila corymbosa, Cardamine lyrata and other ...

In tanks without co2 i place just a litle part of the plant  in the water, and the more out of the water, the roots growns and go to substrate. 

Like this setup.

Shrimp and plants goes together... :)

DSC_5556_zpsvdzdirff.jpg

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For every one baby you see there are 5 you don't. Survival rate will have a lot to do with overall conditions.

I have most success in rearing tanks with lots of algae on the walls, moss and not much else.

Don't over feed tanks with babies, they can't handle adverse conditions. They are better off hunting for food than tripping over it - they are scavengers after all.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

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