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How do you provide calcium?


Nuthatch
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I've never had this problem before, and its only getting worse.  Most of the snails in my 36 gallon tank have turned white.  They are all ramshorns.  I have dropped a chunk of cuttlebone in there but I don't know what else to do. 

 

I have a 9 gallon tank, and the snails in there are normal.  At one point they too were going white so I also dropped a piece of cuttlebone in there.  It seemed to work well for them.  Unfortunately I had to remove it because I believe that it was detrimental to the shrimp.  My ph was dropping & the shrimp were dying and I had no idea how to fix that other than to remove the cuttlebone.  :(

 

If anyone can give me any help with this I would really appreciate it.

 

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Cuttlebone, while similar in composition to aragonite in that it contains many of the minerals needed by invertebrates, sometimes has enough remaining organic matter attached/in it to be a significant source of decaying material. Even if it doesn't seem to raise nitrogeous wastes, it often produces an extremely unpleasant odor. I have had clean ones and I have had ones that produced a stink worthy of a cesspit.

I would give crushed coral (aragonite) a try instead, or montmorillionite powder. For snails, foods rich in calcium are also beneficial, which can be made (search for snail jello recipes) or purchased.

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I would give crushed coral (aragonite) a try instead, or montmorillionite powder. For snails, foods rich in calcium are also beneficial, which can be made (search for snail jello recipes) or purchased.

 

Do any of these change the pH in your tank?  I want to help the snails, but I don't want to have to do something else to then keep the pH at 7.  Unless thats my only option.  :) 

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^-^ Fruit Tums for the win, hehe. It's also possible to feed them to very small mammals that are in need of a calcium boost, although I believe there are supposed to be better options these days. They make SO many different gummy variety supplements these days - makes treating primates a matter of scale and not difficulty hiding supplements.

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It might be a precautionary measure. Since vitamin D is fat-soluble, too much can induce toxicity as it builds up in the body - whereas if you added too much of a water soluble vitamin like C or B12, the excess is simply excreted and there is much less concern about a possible overdose.

I have several forms of calcium supplements, due to having the world's pickiest frog and from having fun experimenting with water chemistry. I still put a pinch of calcium carbonate into the tank water now and again for the snails, because what else am I going to do with it?

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  • 2 months later...

Carib-sea inc. with calcium (buffer plus) It will drive P.H. up and is not recommended for acid loving shrimps & inverts.

Ingredients;

Bicarbonate, carbonate & borate salts, aragonite

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  • 4 weeks later...

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