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Catalpa trees


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So I've been reading up on the catappa tree. Very interesting. It can grow up to 8' per year. Which makes harvesting it very easy. But among harvesting it I'm curious about a few things.

I know everyone uses leaves and bark for there tanks.

But what about the actual wood. The roots. The seed shell. If you can use leaves and bark why not the rest of the tree as well? Wouldn't the while tree when cut and dried correctly be viable for tannins antibacterial and anti fungal properties???

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In general, the bark and outside layers of the tree have more "schtuff" in them than the wood core itself. Most of the wood of a tree is just leftover shells of dead cells that are structural support. The bark and inner bark especially, have more of the plant's living cells, fluids, sap, etc. where you'd likely find the useful chemicals that do whatever-it-is they do. (Lower pH, antimicrobial activity, etc.)

I don't know if Catappa seeds or other parts have any properties, but I'd guess that's why the bark and leaves are more sought after than the wood. Seeds/fruits/roots may also be harder to come by or harvest, and therefore less economical, than the plentiful bark and leaves.

PS your title says "Catalpa", which is a different tree from Catappa, and got me all excited that there was yet another tree leaf known to be safe for shrimp! I wish I lived in a less urban area where I didn't have to worry about what sprays and chemicals have been randomly doused on plants.

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I know I'm to lazy to change it to catappa haha.

I ordered some seeds from someone and I'm going to plant 3 to begin with. I don't plant on letting the tree grow more than 6' I'm going to keep it short and bushy and when I deem the time right I will chop it and harvest the bark.

The reason I asked if the whole tree is usable is because when I recieve the seeds and start growing it I don't want the tree to end up as fire wood haha,

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Yeah I'll end up doing that. It'll still have anti bacterial and fungL properties I would imagine. The branches can be dried and used for dw. Bark can be peeled and used for tanks and the leaves as well. The seeds can be collected and sold of eaten.

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So upon stumbling an a very inactive apisto forum and trying to get he active members more active I discovered that many people use magnolia grandiflora leaves in there apisto tanks. Has anyone here used these types of leaves in shrimp tanks?

I've used ial. Catappa bark. Green walnt leaves. Guava leaves. Oak leaves. Mulberry leaves.

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Magnolia leaves take FOREVER to break down!!! Much longer than IAL. They are no better, or worse than the latter.

I have several bags of them from a previous poison dart frog tank venture. Too bad cork bark floats because I have almost 40 pieces that are about 10"x18" that I never used in my terrariums.

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So in theory magnolia leaves are safe to use in an invert tank?

I so want to do a vicarium for dart frogs. When we have our own place and more room that's what I plant on doing. Right now I have two tanks and working on a third to have two sp apisto breeding and my shrimp project going.

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