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Shadow Panda and Blue Bolt


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I have some questions about colors of these shrimp when they're babies, young adults.

When can we say that black panda is a shadow? I mean many of us know that some black pandas look blue (not white) while they're babies but later they're losing that blue color and become regular black pandas. So, when it is safe to assume that it's a shadow panda? What size or age?

 

Also I read a DETA's post somewhere here about young BB. I'm sorry if I understood it wrong but I think he said that BB look not so bright/high quality when they're babies. Is it true? If so again, when we can see the true color of the shrimp?

 

Thank you for your help!

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I see more color variation (over time) across my blue bolts that any other type of shrimp.

 

I have had several blue bolt juveniles that look very underwhelming, only to mature into good specimens.  

 

One of my "tan bolts", who looked like a yellowed/flawed snow white (that I considered culling) is currently berried in my tank, and grew up to be a FAT mosura blue bolt, just absolutely freaking spectacular.  Her blue coloration is more intense with each passing day.  I now hold a different kind of "respect" for my BBs, and find it quite entertaining how their coloration changes over time.

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Their color seems to change with mood. I tried to start a extreme bb tank recently. I moved only the best ones to this tank and over the next few days their color would decrease dramatically. Once they are settled in and happy again the color would slowly return. (Very slowly)

Normally you can tell at a very young age if a shrimp is a extreme bb or a shadow panda but it is true that sometimes they dont show their true colors until they start to mature. If you keep black pandas and bb together eventually all the pandas will be shadow pandas. This is what happened to me anyway. All my pandas will show at least a little blue eventually. I kinda miss the all white and black pandas now.

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Honestly from my experience I have noticed shrimp start with fantastic coloration and lose it and vice versa. The majority of time though when they reach sub-adult to adult I feel confident in their coloration unless they are berried. Berried females tend to portray a more intense coloration than they may normally show.

 

This is one reason I separated all of my Taiwan Bee colors out. Is to avoid continual breeding across various colors, over time this could potentially dilute coloration and induce coloration not wanted like blue on a White/Black Panda.

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16 hours ago, DETAquarium said:

 

 

This is one reason I separated all of my Taiwan Bee colors out. Is to avoid continual breeding across various colors, over time this could potentially dilute coloration and induce coloration not wanted like blue on a White/Black Panda.

Absolutely,  this is what I do as well.

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