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Shadow Mosura Taiwan Bee


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Speedie hope,you don't mind I used your picture. I was intrigued after Speedie posted this picture. As usually I turned to the net to find out information about these shrimps. I was surprised That every thing I found was done over seas as usual. There's not a lot of information on these guys.

Aim of the thread is to track all the information that I find on this breed and tips on breeding this line.

-Chris

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How in the bloody hell did they breed a blue boltto have black on the top of the head. Or maybe they bred shadows until all that was left was the black and a bit of blue how they bred CRs to flower heads and crown

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I think it is a combination of blue shadow mosura and blue bolt..

The best combination i like would be using :

 

Mosura shadow(male) X blue bolt (female)

 

Blue bolt has snow white gene so it is a stronger shrimp than Shadow. Also if you can selected the bluebolt with the blue on head.

 

This cross will give you some snow white offspring at the beginning.

 

Hope this would help.

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Awesome photo Speedie! Hopefully he turns out to be a male! From what I read more true breeding if it is. Can be done with female though if it is. Be interesting to see how,much the black fills in when it's an adult!

-Chris

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Well I can say one thing I love this little shrimp.....so much I will be the proud owner of him on Tuesday! I really just want to see what I can do with the line. I am more of a fan of trying something new and going from there than doing the same old thing that everyone does. Now it will be great once I get this guy, wish me luck! I am sure ill need it with shipping :stuff:

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I'm guessing male but been wrong before lol. He is still small from what Nick said. Well see soon!

-Chris

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Hi Chris,

 

Coincidentally, I'm specialised in Mosura BB/BKK. Feel free to check with me if you need to know anything.

 

Here are some of my Mosura BBs' photos:

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How to breed them? Hmmm... That's a very long story because Taiwanese and Japanese breeder believe in letting nature take it's course and not intensive in-breeding (except CRS). I will try to make it short and sweet.

 

To breed these Mosura BB, it all started with Panda BKK. Panda BKK is selectively breed into Hinomaru BKK with injection of Snow White gene and CBS Hinomaru and Mosura gene. The result are Hinomaru and Mosura BKK. This variation is very beautiful but has some flaws, which is low production rate and high mortality rate. Thus, it is sold expensively and become unpopular; you can get this in US too. After that, some genus in Taiwan started cross breeding this variation with high grade BB and you end up getting these beautiful Mosura BB, which has much higher survival and breeding rate.

 

The beauty of this variant is not just the look but it's immediate gene pool that has mixture of BKK and BB. Thus, if you are able to get hold of one that has stable Mosura BB gene, you can breed it with BKK or BB and still get Mosura BB with ratio of 1 out of 3. Another resilient aspect of this gene is that I leveraged it to breed out blue spotted head pinto.

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Forgot to answer your OOT question.

 

I did a Google on Taiwan snow grain shrimp food. Don't seems get enough information. If you can get it's Chinese name (which is used in Taiwan) then I can get better information.

 

However based on the picture, it looks like a mixture of powdered food and compressed using a pelletizer. Using pelletizer to make the food has one problem. It will melt in minutes and release into the water column, which may pollute the water.

 

The safer alternative which I strongly recommend is to feed your shrimp with barley straw pellet on top of usual food. Barley straw is safe to scatter around the water column and it is a good food for both shrimps and bacteria. In addition, it will produce oxygen when in the substrate to aerate your substrate to prevent sulphide-fixing bacteria. Plus, you can buy in US easily and cheaply; 1Kg for 5 bucks.

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:)

Forgot to answer your OOT question.

I did a Google on Taiwan snow grain shrimp food. Don't seems get enough information. If you can get it's Chinese name (which is used in Taiwan) then I can get better information.

However based on the picture, it looks like a mixture of powdered food and compressed using a pelletizer. Using pelletizer to make the food has one problem. It will melt in minutes and release into the water column, which may pollute the water.

The safer alternative which I strongly recommend is to feed your shrimp with barley straw pellet on top of usual food. Barley straw is safe to scatter around the water column and it is a good food for both shrimps and bacteria. In addition, it will produce oxygen when in the substrate to aerate your substrate to prevent sulphide-fixing bacteria. Plus, you can buy in US easily and cheaply; 1Kg for 5 bucks.

it's the same ingredients that we all use in the snowflake food. Did my homework already.

-Chris

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Oh.... Then it is soybean shells (a.k.a. edamame shell) that are being pelletised. This is good for protein and fibre boost (I don't think shrimp need fibre). However, avoid feeding too often as it has too much protein.

 

I'm really amaze with pet's product manufacturer. They really know how to market industrial by-products into fancy pet food, not just for shrimps also for fish, dogs and cats.

 

If you guys love to feed this to your shrimp, you should just buy online or from soybean oil factory and it is called "Soy Bean Pellet" that used to feed horse, poultry and fish in farms. If I don't remember wrongly, it cost few bucks for a kilogram.

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The problem is finding ones that have been grown organically and not processed with any sort of preservative. As well as ones with a very low oil content.

Not to mention most websites that I have found sell by the ton. I have only found one website. With 50# bags! but no mention of how the beans are grow

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The problem is finding ones that have been grown organically and not processed with any sort of preservative. As well as ones with a very low oil content.

Not to mention most websites that I have found sell by the ton. I have only found one website. With 50# bags! but no mention of how the beans are grow

 

I see. When I have time, I can try to search for a seller.

 

Actually, the process when the shell is removed, there is no oil yet. Thus, you can don't worry about the oil too much. Also regarding the organic portion, due to shrimp food is classify under pet under, there is no strict law govern what they are claiming. You will need to beware too.

 

But anyway, if you guys are having only just one or two small tanks, it is still much convenient for your guys to buy from the shrimp brand. 

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Very few if any people here can make their own. Its not that it's hard to find soybeans I can go to families and cut my own. Having the pellerizer is not a cheap piece of equipment. Most people aren't going to take that much time to make food. A large bag of snowflake last most a very long time. Only people this would help,is breeders or wanting to make for profit. I've researched both and is cheaper to import than what it cost to make and package.

The reason we have to import so much is that it isn't even close to cost effective to buy locally. Anyting custom around here costs so much because very few are doing it. Overseas the demand is higher and more make these items.

-Chris

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Very few if any people here can make their own. Its not that it's hard to find soybeans I can go to families and cut my own. Having the pellerizer is not a cheap piece of equipment. Most people aren't going to take that much time to make food. A large bag of snowflake last most a very long time. Only people this would help,is breeders or wanting to make for profit. I've researched both and is cheaper to import than what it cost to make and package.

-Chris

 

Yeah. Having a pelletiser is a bad option. It cost at least 500 bucks, plus it is very noisy and dirty when using it. I borrowed one and use before but it turns out to be an epic failure.

 

Actually, what I will recommend is not to just source out for soybean shell. What most shrimp commercial brand has been doing is to take what people has been feeding to fish, poultry or live-stock in farm and re-market it into shrimp food. What you should do is to source out locally what is available and it will make the most sense for you.

 

For example, Oat straw pellet, wheat germ/bran pellet, barley straw pellet, rice bran pellet, rosehip pellet, etc. All these are goodies for shrimp diet too and may contain lesser protein than soybean shell, which may pollute the water.

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