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Siberian Prawn *Exopalaemon modestus* a thriving introduced shrimp in the CA Delta


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I was able to get my hands on a couple specimens of this non-native "prawn" and they happened to be very berried.  These shrimp are an introduced species in the California delta waterways and now act as an important role in our ecological system.  Here are a few photos I snapped to share with everyone.  They are beautiful! 

 

What I am dying to find out is whether they are low order shrimp or not.  

 

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That is a beautiful shrimp. Freshwater too?

 

Yes sir, it is. :)

 

I'm sure this person could shed more light on the foods and proper environment for this prawn as well as what the low order eat: http://www.water.ca.gov/bdma/staff/brown.cfm

 

I tried opening her powerpoint, but I guess I don't have the right software installed.

 

I've looked at her ppt.  It doesn't go into details on what foods the shrimp eat, but they are scavengers like all shrimp. They eat anything lol. 

 

 

I'll take a look.  Thanks man.

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Thanks Bryce.

 

A certian few individuals who have the best cameras with all kinds of fancy lenses can't replicate my work so they get mad and start spreading rumors that I "photoshop" all my pictures.  LOL I find that pretty hilarious.  For the record, I only use photoshop to balance the overall lighting effect and to lay down my watermark/borders.  Everything else is done via camera and remote flash.

 

Yes flash has alot to do with bringing out the colors in any subject at hand.  If used correctly, you can shoot in any tank condition as long as water and glass is clear.  

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do you use autofocus or do you manually focus?

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  • 1 year later...

Wanted to revive this thread since I missed it before.

 

Did anything further ever happen with these? The Exopalaemon modestus (aka Siberian prawn) is a well established non native species here in Oregon, and as such has no restrictions on take of them.

 

I once collected more than 100 in just a few minutes with a dip net, used them as food for some of the more picky marine species I had at the time. 

 

Were you successful in getting them to reproduce?

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where in Oregon? I'm visiting Portland pretty soon and would like to see if i can grab some cool shrimps. :) Last time i went hiking at Punchbowl Falls and was able to grab 2 sandwich bag size of mini pillia. Hoping to get something different this time around.

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You probably won't hear from Speedie. He's been out of the shrimp scene for quite some time now. He's crazy talented at the things he does. After he moved and got out of the shrimp scene he's got into his other passions, fishing and painting fishing lures (he is really good at that too!). Here's his other Facebook of the lures he paints. https://www.facebook.com/SpeedLures 

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19 hours ago, thekonexperiment said:

where in Oregon? I'm visiting Portland pretty soon and would like to see if i can grab some cool shrimps. :) Last time i went hiking at Punchbowl Falls and was able to grab 2 sandwich bag size of mini pillia. Hoping to get something different this time around.

 

The most abundant place that I have found them is in a pond on Sauvie Island and in a small creek off of the Columbia River.

 

Here's my last entry for them on the Non-Indigenous Aquatic Species website (also has GPS points for them ;) )

http://nas.er.usgs.gov/queries/SpecimenViewer.aspx?SpecimenID=877347

 

Here's the google maps point map for where I found them on Sauvie Island in McNary Lake:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/45%C2%B047'28.0%22N+122%C2%B047'51.9%22W/@45.791118,-122.7988443,18z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0

There is a small Canoe access at that point in the lake that you can wade around along the shallows of the banks and net shrimp easily.

 

 

 

 

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Also, if you are in to odd species to catch on your own, there is an introduced small freshwater goby found in the same area.  Commonly called an Armur Goby (Rhinogobius brunneus)

 

Here'e the NIAS listing for them:

http://nas.er.usgs.gov/viewer/omap.aspx?SpeciesID=2612

 

Heres the google map link to the place I last caught them on my way out to McNary lake on Sauvie Island:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/45%C2%B045'11.2%22N+122%C2%B046'07.7%22W/@45.7685954,-122.8461723,12z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0

 

The males look pretty awesome and the species can live in room temperature water easily :)

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