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catapa leaves


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Just leave it as it is. As I understand it, the shrimp don't actually eat the leaf itself but the micro-organisms that break down the leaf and the biofilm that grows on it over time.

 

I stick my cattapa indian almond leaves in my tank and I don't usually see them visually breaking down and turning into a skeleton until about three weeks in.

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They eat the bio film that grows on the leaf as it decomposes. Just soak in hot water to soften then add to tank. No need to freeze them, just store in a Ziploc bag. 

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Everyone is spot on. I simply take it out of the bag, give it a quick rinse with RODI water, and throw into the aquarium. It will take a couple days to gradually sink, at that time though the beneficial tannins will begin leaching. This is when your water may slightly change in appearance but its these tannins that have the anti-bacterial/fungal properties. Once the leaf sinks, place it where you wish, over the next couple of weeks to months this leaf will generate biofilm, and begin breaking down. As it breaks down you will notice more and more of your shrimp on and around the leaf, because of the micro-organisms breaking it down.

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I use IAL in all my tanks, betta included. But, is there a reason it is SO different with amaranth leaves? My IAL go just as you all have stated. Amaranth leaves literally get attacked and are gone in 24 so I am guessing they are actually eating the leave and not just the biofilm???

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Amanranth/Mulberry leaves serve a different purpose to IAL/Guava Leaves. Amaranth/Mulberry leaves are used as food sources, as a replacement to manufactured foods. IAL/Guava are used in the same way as Alder Cones and Cholla Wood, they are more or less supplements/water conditioners (the natural way) for your shrimp tank. Amanranth/Mulberry leaves are used for the vitamins and minerals that the shrimp consume. IAL/Guava leaves are used primarily for their anti-bacterial/fungal properties (prevention method), and their ability to generate biofilm. 

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Amanranth/Mulberry leaves serve a different purpose to IAL/Guava Leaves. Amaranth/Mulberry leaves are used as food sources, as a replacement to manufactured foods. IAL/Guava are used in the same way as Alder Cones and Cholla Wood, they are more or less supplements/water conditioners (the natural way) for your shrimp tank. Amanranth/Mulberry leaves are used for the vitamins and minerals that the shrimp consume. IAL/Guava leaves are used primarily for their anti-bacterial/fungal properties (prevention method), and their ability to generate biofilm. 

Thanks - this is so helpful. I have been wondering about this for a while! I'm glad you asked, Crazyfishlady!

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I get mine from han, online http://www.hanaquatics.com/woods-leaves-natural-products/ . I have gotten on ebay too and we have other sponsors but "leaf litter" is good for shrimp.

 

I have IAL, guava an oak in the tanks (ripped up pieces and some whole, random variety). Those just sit in the tank. They crawl on them, hide under them, and 'graze' on the biofilm on them.

 

Amaranth leaves go in about once a week and my snowballs swim to the top and try to drag that thing down so they can eat it, lol. My other shrimp have better manners and wait until it sinks ;)

 

Just get from a trusted source and if you get it from the wild make sure it has not been sprayed with anything

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