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neo vs card 'shell thickness'


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Odd question

 

I've seen products that are said to thicken/strengthen a shrimp's shell and promote better moulting.

 

It made me wonder about my neos and tangerine tigers, they don't seem to have the same type of 'shell' as the cards, at least in appearance.

 

The cards seem more armor like, is that only because of coloring?

 

Would a product like I mentioned be harmful or bad for neos and TTs?

 

 

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I've been using shrimpy daddy's products with me TB tank that also has blue rilis in it and their shells are nice a glossy like the cards now. I don't know for sure but I think they have the same shell type, but a lot of neos are clear so you can't tell.

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That stuff isn't going to hurt them. The only way to find out if it makes a difference with your shrimp is to try it. I will say though, I was using tap water and prime before and my shrimp didn't look as nice as they do now that I switched to ro.

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To really know what a shrimp food/supplement does, you have to analyze the ingredients.

 

Shrimp Nature Orange Ingredients: Flour, arctic krill, shrimp flour, soy flour, pulp Gammarus, Maka from eggshells, montmorillonite, Hokkaido, Rice Bran, pollen, beeswax, gluten, yeast, Astaxanthin.

(edit: see further post for discrepancy on ingredient list. Company website does not list flour as the first ingredient)

 

Flour is typically used as a binder but in this case, as the first ingredient, it is a filler. Big red flag there as it is the first ingredient and makes up the majority of the food.

Artic Krill is an excellent source of aquatic protein. 

Shrimp "Flour" usually refers to the dried leftovers of shrimp processing. Not a great source of protein but it will have a lot of chitin from the shells,heads and antennae which is good in this case.

Soy flour is a binding agent.

Gammarus are scuds and a popular shrimp food ingredient. Loads of chitin for shell formation.

Maka from egg shells. Not sure what maka is but egg shells are a good source of calcium as they are basically calcium carbonate.

Montmorillonite is another popular shrimp food ingredient. It is a clay that supposedly helps molting by providing lots of trace minerals.

Hokkaido is a Japanese pumpkin very rich in vitamins. Another popular shrimp food ingredient.

Rice Bran is a filler 

Pollen and beeswax are so far down the list that there is probably negligible amounts. Pollen is a very popular shrimp food in europe.

Gluten and yeast are fillers/binders.

Astaxanthin is a colour enhancer mainly for red and dark coloured shrimp. It has been proven to cause unwanted effects on lighter coloured shrimp specially yellows.

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To really know what a shrimp food/supplement does, you have to analyze the ingredients.

 

Shrimp Nature Orange Ingredients: Flour, arctic krill, shrimp flour, soy flour, pulp Gammarus, Maka from eggshells, montmorillonite, Hokkaido, Rice Bran, pollen, beeswax, gluten, yeast, Astaxanthin.

 

Flour is typically used as a binder but in this case, as the first ingredient, it is a filler. Big red flag there as it is the first ingredient and makes up the majority of the food.

Artic Krill is an excellent source of aquatic protein. 

Shrimp "Flour" usually refers to the dried leftovers of shrimp processing. Not a great source of protein but it will have a lot of chitin from the shells,heads and antennae which is good in this case.

Soy flour is a filler/binding agent.

Gammarus are scuds and a popular shrimp food ingredient. Loads of chitin for shell formation.

Maka from egg shells. Not sure what maka is but egg shells are a good source of calcium as they are basically calcium carbonate.

Montmorillonite is another popular shrimp food ingredient. It is a clay that supposedly helps molting by providing lots of trace minerals.

Hokkaido is a Japanese pumpkin very rich in vitamins. Another popular shrimp food ingredient.

Rice Bran is a filler 

Pollen and beeswax are so far down the list that there is probably negligible amounts. Pollen is a very popular shrimp food in europe.

Gluten and yeast are fillers/binders.

Astaxanthin is a colour enhancer mainly for red and dark coloured shrimp. It has been proven to cause unwanted effects on lighter coloured shrimp specially yellows.

Wow - thank you for taking the time to break that all down - seriously.. thank you!!

 

It looks like... if the flour and Astaxanthin were to be removed this would be a good food. I should have known to look for astax as I have avoided that at all costs because of my snowballs.

 

I'm going to keep this great breakdown so I can use it to review other sources. HUGE HELP!!!!

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I just looked at the company website (translated) and it doesn't list wheat as the first ingredient. In which case, Shrimp Nature Orange is a high quality food with ingredients targeted at shell enhancement. Soybean flour is better than wheat flour and that far down the list, it is used primarily as a binder and not a filler.

 

Ingredient list for shrimpnature.pl : Krill Flour, Shrimp Flour, Soybeans Flour, Gammarus, Egg Shells Calcium, Montmorillonite, Hokkaido, Rice Bran, Bee Pollen, Gluten, Yeast, Astaxanthin.

 

On two different vendor websites, they both list flour as the first ingredient. Not sure what source I would trust. Maybe they changed the recipe at some point.

 

 

This site is aimed at fish food, but very appropriate for shrimp food as well.

http://www.oscarfish.com/fish-food-ingredients.html

 

If you look at high quality food, they use very little (if any) filler/binder ingredients which is better for the shrimp. Unfortunately, this also means that usually the food doesn't stay together very long in the water. Feeding dishes are a must.

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You are a fountain of info!! :) I wish it didn't have the Astaxanthin in it though. I stay far away from anything with that in it because of my snowballs

 

Anyone have ideas on a good food for shell and molting that doesn't have that?

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