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What makes a pinto a pinto?


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Thank you for the more detailed explanation of full coloration Dendrobatez.  I see that the article is stressing the difference between German and Taiwan Pintos.  I know this is going to be a stupid question, but here goes.  Does that matter?  Is it important to have that distinction?

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I feel like the article is more about clearing up some of the confusion in the terminology used for the different pattern variations and not to say one is better than the other. It says "Till date, these shrimps are still named “German Pinto” as a form of respect as the pattern of these shrimps are founded by a German breeder even though they are bred massively in Taiwan" so to me its about paying homage to the shrimps origins rather than simply classifying them. Personal opinion though, I don't own any at the moment - soon...

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That is a great article I have read a couple times. 

 

A pinto is made by crossing either a CRS/CBS x Tiger or Taiwan Bee x Tiger. The result is a Tibee, you then need to cross the Tibee back to a Taiwan Bee, the result is a TaiTibee. These TaiTibee usually have various patterns and shades of coloration that will enhance as you get farther down the generation(s) (F1, F2, F3, etc). A Pinto shrimp is technically a TaiTibee with a specific pattern, Zebra, Spotted Head, Skunk, etc. that usually show up as early as a F2 generation, but will be more prevalent in the later.

 

This may of been a little over-the-top, but I feel it may help with your idea behind a Pinto shrimp.

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That is a great article I have read a couple times. 

 

A pinto is made by crossing either a CRS/CBS x Tiger or Taiwan Bee x Tiger. The result is a Tibee, you then need to cross the Tibee back to a Taiwan Bee, the result is a TaiTibee. These TaiTibee usually have various patterns and shades of coloration that will enhance as you get farther down the generation(s) (F1, F2, F3, etc). A Pinto shrimp is technically a TaiTibee with a specific pattern, Zebra, Spotted Head, Skunk, etc. that usually show up as early as a F2 generation, but will be more prevalent in the later.

 

This may of been a little over-the-top, but I feel it may help with your idea behind a Pinto shrimp.

 

great description of how/what a pinto is.

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I have both the spotted head Pinto Mischlings and a black Taiwan Pinto.  My male Taiwan looks identical to the one in the photo of this article and my spotted headed black mischlings are the same as the one in the photo but not a good quality as that one (my females have some less solid areas in the shell)   

 

I have 2 females with a lot of eggs (soon to hatch maybe this week) and I am hoping that the Taiwan Pinto male is the Daddy.  What comes out I don't have a clue.

 

They are totally cool looking shrimps and I like them better than the regular Taiwan Bees.

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Pinto has more stripes than TB, due to gene from Tiger ancestor.

 

So far I know. head spot is unique trait of German Pinto.

 

Taiwan breeders try to duplicate the German Pinto with head spots without success, though they created Taiwan Pinto ( zebra, white belly, etc).

 

Taiwan Pinto does have unique ones. Like Fishbone Pinto.

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