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When is a hybrid pure?


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I just posted on fb about yellow king kong being a hybrid between TT and KK.  Soon after, someone posted they are not a hybrid anymore since they breed true.

 

It was then that I realized I have a gap in my knowledge.  When do hybrids become a "pure breed?"  I'd like to learn. :)

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I can't speak for shrimp but with reptiles you can call the morph after f2 or 2nd clutch shows said phenotype when that clutch breeds (this is where inbreeding is a must) if the babies come out 100% morph then it is pure, if the babies come out half and half or what ever then they are het for that phenotype.

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Once a hybrid always a hybrid.

In this case it is the cross is between two different species. The genomes of species were mixed, which means it is a hybrid per definition, and will always stay a hybrid no matter if it breeds true. If you have the proper genetic markers you will always proof DNA from both parental species. Hybrids are very common among plants and can evolved into separate species.

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No references just what I was told by my local poison control lived near by and had some crazy reptiles so I would help clean cages and learn as much as I could. I would think it's always a hybrid as well but look at the AmericaN bull dog it's made up for 4 other spiecies

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Right, dogs are one species. Breeds is probably the right term. And you don't want your dogs to be genetically identical.

For mice used for science you can get genetically (almost) identical lines after F8-F10.

Well, the term hybrid can also applied when you cross two individuals from the same species that display different traits. In the simplest case, if they only differ at one genomic location, which is highly unlikely, you can get the parental phenotypes in F2 and hybrids, if you assume simple Mendelian genetics. But most inherited traits are non-Mendelian.

 

Even if a phenotype (morph) appears pure after some generations, you can still have genetic variations at other positions in the genome that don't translate into an obvious phenotype. It all depends how carefully you look, for example using genetic tools. For breeding animals and plants, it is always good to have some (hidden) variation.

Still a hybrid will stay a hybrid even if it breeds true. Biology 101.

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