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PRL shrimp


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It takes one second. As soon as a berried PRL gives birth, you have created PRL. :P

If you're asking about making PRL's from regular CRS, I'm guessing at least five years, perhaps more, since the recessive (we're assuming here) golden genes can hide for quite some time in a colony. If you only keep a few shrimps and are able to keep track of who's who though, you may be able to do that a lot faster.

If you're talking about perfecting a PRL line from an existing line, that just depends on what your standard is, how fast your shrimps breed, and how much you're culling.

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Funny... Nice joke.

i am talking starting from scratch.

i started my first colony back in 2008. 20 pieces low grade bee shrimp.

Mixed red and black. I let them breed out for a year. By then got few hundred pieces,

out of those few hundred pieces picked out the best looking ones and started another colony.

to be continued...

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Monday, 01 August 2011 02:28 Start Off in a Pure Way 

To start off your Pure Red Line (纯系) breeding program without golden (white shrimp) recessive genes, the best way to send them for DNA test. But.... thats the practical, here, is another method that can be carried out to validate your Pure Red Line breeding stock carries golden genes. Golden CRS offsprings can appear after many generation of breeding if the initial breeding stock is not tested even without intentional introduction of golden genes.

Golden genes in Pure Red Line is deemed undesirable by majorities in communities around the world. 

The method as follow: 
- Pair A: PRL female with a golden male
- Pair B: PRL male with a golden female

If Pair A has no golden offsprings but all red offsprings, then the female in Pair A does not has golden genes.
If Pair B has no golden offsprings but all red offsprings, then the  male in Pair B does not has golden genes.

After you have confirmed both PRL of different sex has no golden genes, put these 2 together to breed, the offsprings are confirmed not to carry golden genes, so will be the offsprings' offspring.

The chances of these 2 to breed out golden offsprings, the chance of it will be extremely remote, just like striking a $10mil lottery, but this time, the breeder get no prize.

 

 

old article from SilaneShrimp.

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Tough to say they'll ever be PRL.  I'm no expert on shrimp genes but if the Golden gene is a recessive gene it be hidden by a large group.  You would almost need to breed every shrimp in your colony to a Golden bee to prove their purity.

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i dont think its possible for the quality to get better without culling.  

 

I agree but there could be the extreme case where the founding stock was so poor quality that water conditions and diet improved quality.

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i guess you can say all my colonies are culls.

i just spent a couple of hours going through a colony over a thousand pieces

trying to select 30 to 40 of those that have the most solid white coverage. you cant just eyeball

these shrimp, you have to use a big magnifying glass.

i know these days you can lay down $$$ on these PRL from Asia.

These PRL are amazing. Ellen Wangs competition grade PRL is what keeps me going to

hopefully one day to produce shrimp like hers.

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I'd say you already have PRL's then. You're now improving it's quality by culling, and that's a process you never stop doing. As to when you can start labeling and selling them as your own PRL's, that's completely up to you depending on what your goal is.

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I see threads like this all the time and imho it is irrelevant if they are called PRL or not after X generation. What matter is the quality - the question should be how many generation (or years) of selective breeding would it take to get from (insert picture of your current shrimps) to this (insert picture of your target).

if you go by the timeline of when the first CRS were discovered and to where we are now, you are looking at around 10-15 years of selective breeding.

speaking as someone who has been selectively breeding my own line of PRL, you only want to pick out the best 1-2 males and 4-6 females from each generation, plus a small colony for backup; the rest of the shrimp has little to no value in terms of advancing your line, so it doesn't really matter what you call them.

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Yes, of course that is if you started with low quaility shrimps but still lots of work neverthelesss. That is why I recommended that if you are serious about breeding high quality shrimps (and quite confident about your ability to keep them alive), spend the money on high grade shrimps, preferably a Japanese line; it is money well spent considering the amount of time that has been spent by the breeder to get them to that point.

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turn up the heat a little....Per MKBREED - "Best temperature for breeding 77F.  High temperatures will reduce the lifespan of the shrimps, lower temperatures increases the amount of dissolved oxygen, and higher temperature reduces the amount of dissolved oxygen.  Although keeping shrimps in lower temperature helps prolong their life, it’ll decrease their appetite and breeding rate. "  

 

in short your shrimp mature faster and the gestation time will be shorter... but con is it will shorten the shrimps lives but when you are trying to develop a high quality line and you want to get through many generations quicker every day counts.

 

http://www.discobee.com/blogs/news/16758609-mk-breed-how-to-pick-and-selectively-breed-crystal-shrimp

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Yeah i saw that MK Breed video...  2 hours long.

A lot of useful info. I don't know about turning up the heat though.

i know they slow down below 70 degrees and get distressed and lose their color at higher temps.

To me the sweet spot is 72 degrees. Not too hot and not too cold.

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Yeah i saw that MK Breed video... 2 hours long.

A lot of useful info. I don't know about turning up the heat though.

i know they slow down below 70 degrees and get distressed and lose their color at higher temps.

To me the sweet spot is 72 degrees. Not too hot and not too cold.

Where is this video. I am interested.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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