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How often can you do water changes without the bacteria falling behind with the cycle.?


ShrimpSA
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The bacteria responsible for converting ammonia to nitrite are called nitrosomas, and nitrobacter converts nitrite to nitrate.  One reason you change water is to lower nitrate, which at 40  parts per million or more can be harmful to fish. Shrimp are better off below 20 parts per million.  Neither form of the above mentioned bacteria live in the water.  Most of them live on your aquarium filter and as already said on the surfaces of your aquarium.   10 to 50 percent water change once per week is usually sufficient depending on the biological load of the tank.  Nitrates are used up by both plants and another form of bacteria that grows in low oxegen low flow areas.  Even if you provide a method of lowering nitrates,  you should still do water changes to replace used up minerals that fish and shimp need.  If the water used for a water change is the same tempature as the tank, you can change more or alot more of the water at a time. Never use hot water from the tap, but preheat the water however you choose.  If the water is a different tempature  than the water in the tank, smaller more frequent water changes are best.  The reason for that is not only is a drastic tempature change bad for your aquatic life, it can cause a die off of the benificial bacteria that live in your filter and on the tanks surfaces.   That is why sometimes large water changes can crash a tank.

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The bacteria responsible for converting ammonia to nitrite are called nitrosomas, and nitrobacter converts nitrite to nitrate. One reason you change water is to lower nitrate, which at 40 parts per million or more can be harmful to fish. Shrimp are better off below 20 parts per million. Neither form of the above mentioned bacteria live in the water. Most of them live on your aquarium filter and as already said on the surfaces of your aquarium. 10 to 50 percent water change once per week is usually sufficient depending on the biological load of the tank. Nitrates are used up by both plants and another form of bacteria that grows in low oxegen low flow areas. Even if you provide a method of lowering nitrates, you should still do water changes to replace used up minerals that fish and shimp need. If the water used for a water change is the same tempature as the tank, you can change more or alot more of the water at a time. Never use hot water from the tap, but preheat the water however you choose. If the water is a different tempature than the water in the tank, smaller more frequent water changes are best. The reason for that is not only is a drastic tempature change bad for your aquatic life, it can cause a die off of the benificial bacteria that live in your filter and on the tanks surfaces. That is why sometimes large water changes can crash a tank.

Ah thanks! I understand it much better now. But doesn't the tap water also contain ammonia? That is always my worry. But thanks I understand it all well now!

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Ah thanks! I understand it much better now. But doesn't the tap water also contain ammonia? That is always my worry. But thanks I understand it all well now!

Sent from my GT-I9300 using Tapatalk

Tap water shouldn't contain any ammonia. With that being said though your location's tap water may vary. The only way to be sure is by testing it.

Same thing holds true for chlorine and chloramine. Many places add it but not all. That would be harder to test (I think), but if you use RO/DI water you shouldn't have to worry about it. Otherwise I would use a dechlorinator to be on the safe side. You can let your water sit for 24hr to dissipate any chlorine, but chloramine won't dissipate.

Besides being harmful to fish and shrimp, chlorine/chloramine can kill your bacteria (which is why it's added), and why it is highly recommended to clean your filter media in dirty tank water :)

-Duffy

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Tap water shouldn't contain any ammonia. With that being said though your location's tap water may vary. The only way to be sure is by testing it.

Same thing holds true for chlorine and chloramine. Many places add it but not all. That would be harder to test (I think), but if you use RO/DI water you shouldn't have to worry about it. Otherwise I would use a dechlorinator to be on the safe side. You can let your water sit for 24hr to dissipate any chlorine, but chloramine won't dissipate.

Besides being harmful to fish and shrimp, chlorine/chloramine can kill your bacteria (which is why it's added), and why it is highly recommended to clean your filter media in dirty tank water :)

-Duffy

So would dechlorinator remove chloramine?

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Ah thanks! I understand it much better now. But doesn't the tap water also contain ammonia? That is always my worry. But thanks I understand it all well now!

 

 

Cloramine is a mixture of chlorine and ammonia.  So yes, if your city uses cloramines to decontaminate the system, then it surely contains ammonia, in a compound state.  You will have to call your water department to find out what they use.  Seachem prime neutralizes both straight chlorine and cloramines, so as mentioned this is the best stuff to use when in doubt, and even period, in my opinion.

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Prime also has some other uses which come handy in a pinch.  It really is a great product.

 

Prime
Product Description

Prime® is the complete and concentrated conditioner for both fresh and salt water. Prime® removes chlorine, chloramine and ammonia. Prime® converts ammonia into a safe, non-toxic form that is readily removed by the tank’s biofilter. Prime® may be used during tank cycling to alleviate ammonia/nitrite toxicity. Prime® detoxifies nitrite and nitrate, allowing the biofilter to more efficiently remove them. It will also detoxify any heavy metals found in the tap water at typical concentration levels. Prime® also promotes the production and regeneration of the natural slime coat. Prime® is non-acidic and will not impact pH. Prime® will not overactivate skimmers. Use at start-up and whenever adding new water.

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