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Natural Products


ctaylor3737
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What I have loved about shrimp is that they tolerate very well a bunch of natural products that we can add to the tank and they will benefit from. There are many different products out there that claim to be the best and will give you this result or that result. The trick is to try a few things that are different and see how your shrimp react to them. There are a few things that are great to add to your tank that will help the overall health of your shrimp.

 

Cholla Wood

 

Cholla Wood provides the perfect place for shrimp to hide and is a great natural decoration. This wood breaks down faster than most others resulting in a faster bio film\grazing area for shrimp there fore it is will be an excellent long term natural food source.

 

The Cholla cactus (Cylindropuntia imbricata) are native to the American Southwest and northern Mexico. The remnants of these dead cactus branches results in a soft wood. Cholla Wood has an interesting pattern and does not contain as much tannic acids as other woods or leaves. For the best result add a few to your tank and use them as decorations. I have seen people attach moss and others have used them in scapes.

 

There are many different natural products that you may be able to find in your area that you can add to your tank to spruce up your scape and help the overall health of your shrimp. I will be adding more products to this thread as I come across them. Figured this would be a good place for someone new to shrimp to get answers as to why people put these things in with our shrimp!

 

 

Indian Almond Leaves

Indian Almond leaves are a great natural way to condition your water. Sometimes they are refferred to as a poor mans water conditioner, the

In the wild fish, shrimp and other aquatic animals adapt to the water conditions that are around them.  Even if your fish manages to survive in less than ideal conditions, there is a great difference between thriving and merely staying alive. If your fish or shrimp is found where there is leaves and other plant debris regularly falls into the water and decompose, your fish will be used to that kind of environment and that is where natural products are so healthy to add to an aquarium, Leaves that fall into the water release a myriad of different compounds, from trace minerals to dyes, and animals living in the water adapt to having all these different compounds readily available. When we place fish in our “clean” and rather unnatural aquariums, we in avertedly deprive them of access to a long row of different compounds present in their native habitat. This is often why people with planted tanks often have better luck with the same kind of fish someone has that is not planted. Using these leaves will help you make a stable and more natural enviroment for your inhabitants.

 

Just like driftwood and peat, Indian almond leaves release ample amounts of tannins into the water. The tannins affect the pH-value (how much will depend on the buffer capacity of your water) and you will also see how the water turns dark – just like a blackwater river. Needless to say, water rich in tannins is appreciated by fish species that hail from such environments in the wild. So called blackwater habitats are formed when rivers flow slowly through heavily forested areas where falling leaves and other plant debris end up decomposing in the water. This is quite natural and will benefit to your advantage. If you are not fond of tannis it will be removed with your filter, although it is better to let it run its course and not to interfere with it. Usually a leaf or two will do the job and will decompose and get eatin by your shrimp in the aquarium.

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Good info!

Cholla, alder cones, Indian almond leave, and a bunch more!!!

Hanzorz at Verizon.net

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Agreed we need more articles and reviews on the site :)

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  • 5 weeks later...

This may be a bump but every tank should have this. I mean EVERY.

I really didn't believe that these were beneficial and thought it was just another thing people tried to make money off of. After adding 1 cholla wood, 1 IAL and 8 alder cones into my 10g tank. These has been an increase in activity and grazing. These are a must have for a happy shrimp tank. My tank looks like tea now but pH is still the same. 

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This may be a bump but every tank should have this. I mean EVERY.

I really didn't believe that these were beneficial and thought it was just another thing people tried to make money off of. After adding 1 cholla wood, 1 IAL and 8 alder cones into my 10g tank. These has been an increase in activity and grazing. These are a must have for a happy shrimp tank. My tank looks like tea now but pH is still the same.

It helps them with good bacteria also. There are different kinds of leaves to use also. I use maple leaves to.

-Chris

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My tank looks like tea which is okay since the shrimp are enjoying it. Good thing it's not altering my parameters.

It will come out after a day or so. The filters will remove it eventually.

-Chris

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was just thinking about ordering some Teak Leaves.  They have a similar effect to Indian Almond Leaves.

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  • 2 weeks later...

When added to shrimp tank, Is there any rule of number of leaves per gallon?

not really just a few will do.

-Chris

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  • 2 months later...

Yesterday I added 2 banana leaves and 4 alder cones to my 19L cherry shrimp tank. Also got 2 moss-balls in there from the set-up.

The water is now the colour of strong tea and the shrimp seem to be lethargic and appear to be almost stoned! Are they just well-chilled or could they be affected adversely by these things?

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I'm still new, but maybe adding so many at once altered the pH and stressed them? I would test your waters params.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Thanks Allicat - the water parameters were ok and the pH hadn't changed. I thought they would lower the pH a little but they hadn't. The next day I removed all but 2 alder cones and did a 50%water change just so I could see them.

I think the reason they were stunned into inactivity was the temp I was keeping them. The breeder had told me they'd been raised at 21C/70F, with TDS of 250 so I'd matched it. I'm now running that tank between 22-24 and they are more visible, active and eating. 

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