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Shrimp Which Defy All Odds


mayphly
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I started cycling 3 new tanks 21 days ago. I'm using amazonia substrate. On the third day I added a bunch of salvinia which I pulled out of one of my TB tanks and dumped them into the new tanks. Today while changing my water I spot a tiny peewee blue bolt scooting across the bottom of one of the new tanks. This guy has been in this tank for 18 days. I couldn't believe it! I never really test my parameters until around the 30 day mark. But, I had to test to see what this guy has been surving in. Here are my curent parameters in this tank. I ran my api liquid tests twice just to be sure. I use plain tap water w/ prime which has a PH near 8 right out of the tap.

 

Temps- 82

PH- aprox 6.4 (pinpoint still dropping super slow)

GH-0-1

KH-0-1

NH3-2.0-3.0ppm

NO3-0

NO2-0

 

So, I would imagine when the little guy was first put in this tank the ammonia would have been a lot higher.

I curently have the little guy dripping back into his original home. Hope he makes it! Be strong little fella!! :gym:

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If he survived the initial shock I think he'll survive a slow drip. It would have been interesting to see how he would of made our in there. Too bad I have other plans for that tank. Here's "Miracle" the shrimp.

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Wow! A few months ago I was going to post a topic similar to this. I setup a Taiwan bee tank around July 2014 and added shrimp roughly a month and a half to two months later. Let's just say September or so. When I broke down the tanks and moved the Taiwan Bees over to my new setups it was around June of this year give or take a month. I found a adult Taiwan Bee in the canister filter! How he/she got there I have no idea, I have SS filter guards on my input(s). Either way this shrimp has been acclimated and is still doing well in my new Taiwan Bee tank. Crazy to think it grew from a shrimplet to adult in my canister filter.

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I bork down one of the blue neo tank a few months ego, I drained all water out and put the tank outside in the back yard. Now it's filled with rain water and I found around 8 shrimps in there few days ego they doing just fine and almost fully grown. The temperature at night can drop below 10c and I believe rain water is almost 0 tds, no adding food and no filtration. Amazing.

I'm not going to move them just want to see if they can handle low temperature in the winter.

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I agree Andy. Contrary to many beliefs I find Taiwan Bees very easy to keep now days. There are just a few "must-haves" to ensure easy keeping and breeding.

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Almost every time I cycle ADA soil and a good moss I end up finding shrimp in it a few weeks later, tigers are especially bad hitchhiker s. I think the low pH of the water keeps the ammonia from being in its toxic form.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've got two stories about miracle shrimp! 

 

One was a few years back, I had dismantled my 29 gallon which had some Amanos in it and gave all my fish and shrimp to a friend.. or so I thought! I had still left about an inch of water in the tank, after a few months later I was sitting near the tank and out of the corner of my eye I saw a little shrimp swim by! 

 

The second time was when I was setting up my current tank. A local fish store has dismantled their shrimp tank about a month previously.. ( a little bit of water was still in the gravel). I asked if I could have the gravel so he packed it up in a bag and I took it home. I set up my tank, poured in the new gravel and after the dust settled within a week I found 3 little babies cherries swimming around! Not only did they survive a month in an almost empty tank but also being scooped up and squished into a bag with the gravel, and then poured with the gravel into a new tank! Hardy shrimp! 

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I received some shrimp earlier this week and it had a ton of moss in the bag. I have too much and was going to toss it but decided to keep the moss and put it in a shallow plastic container with just enough water to keep the moss wet. Just hatched some kilifish and decided to use the moss for them. When I put the moss in my marina hatchery tonight, I see 4 tiny little shrimplets. It amazes me how we spend a ton of money keeping them alive and then read all these crazy stories.

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I've been following this thread, and now, after yesterday, I can say "you're all amateurs"!  I say "meh" to your little tales!   :D

 

OK, now turn on the comical old man voice in the back of your head while you read this...

 

In my day, water was scarce.  Our shrimp were lucky to have water at all.  And when they did, they were thankful for it!  We let them run around without water until they looked like they might crisp up, then we put them back into the tank.  Those were the real tough shrimp!

 

OK, old man voice back off...

 

So, decided to take a tank down yesterday.  I drained my water down, caught all the shrimp - even the berried female that hides herself in the smallest place possible.  Then, I caught that last shrimp that you always find after you have positively caught all of the shrimp in the tank.  You know which one, it always happens to us.  Fine.  Now, I finish draining all the water out, I scoop out all the substrate and put it in a 5 gallon bucket.  The tank is completely empty, just some substrate smear on the bottom.  My wife comes into the office where I have the tank, and we chat for a while - no real rush with anything.  I take the tank downstairs and I put it on the kitchen table.  I look at it a bit, and start thinking about whether or not I want to take out the Styrofoam back wall that I have on it.  This is an ADA 60P tank, and when I got it, I bought a 3D textured styrofoam wall for it which I held in place with acrylic aquarium sealant.  If I wanted to take this background out, I was going to have to razor blade all that off the glass, then get some new backing of some type for the back wall.  Decisions, decisions.  So, by now it has probably been 25 minutes or so that the tank has been dry (don't have an exact time, but it has been at least that long).  So, I decide - why don't I check out the back and just see how much sealant I'll have to actually remove to get the background completely out, maybe it won't be that big of a job.  I spin the tank around, and there, on the back of the wall, is a berried female shrimp.  She's losing her color, and is obvious need of hydration, but she's still crawling around on the background - see attached picture.  Somehow, while netting the shrimp out, she managed to find a small gap, and get herself behind the background and the back wall of the tank.  The gap or space back there is about 1/4 to 1/3" deep, maybe?  It's indented, and enough for a shrimp, but not a lot of space.  I don't know where she found the crack to get back there in the first place?  So anyway, there she is, walking around.  Seeing this, I decide that maybe I will take the background out after all - since that's the only possible way to get her out without any water in the tank.  I sprint upstairs, grab a net, grab a clean container, scoop some water out of the tank where I was going to transfer these shrimp into, and come running back downstairs.  I go out to the garage, and find a paint scraper.  I come back in, pick up my phone that was sitting next to the tank, and snap a quick photo - hey, she's made it this long, 20 seconds to record it probably can't hurt.  I very carefully - because it's an ADA tank - run the paint scraper between the back glass, and the back of the 3D background.  I am luckily able to get it to separate without too much effort.  Once I have the background pulled forward at enough of an angle, I carefully work my net down in there, and put it over her.  She "hops" off the background, and safely goes to the bottom of the net. I then very carefully and quickly lift the net out and drop her into the container of tank water.  The other shrimp were getting drip acclimated in a different container, but for her, it was immediate into this new water.  After a few seconds, she backed her way out of the net, and then proceeded to walk around the container as if not much had happened at all.  I continued to watch her for a while, and she was totally responsive, and didn't display any real distress.  After about 45 minutes, I poured her out into her new tank - this one had water in it.

 

Sigh.  Crazy stuff.  I don't know how much more time she would have had. She was still walking/crawling around, but hopefully you can see with the picture here that she was losing a lot of moisture.  I almost wanted to put her in her own tank just to observe how she does long term, and if her babies will make it OK, etc, but I only had that one tank that matched her params closely.  With all that she had been through, I figure she needed to be in the same tank with all of the other shrimp she was with before.  Today, she continues to look well, and as near as I can tell behaving just like her tank mates. She's a bit hard to find since she's with 70 or so other shrimp, and maybe a 6-7 other berried females, but if I look for a bit, I can track her down.  We'll keep her under observation.  I'm sure she has a story to tell with the other shrimp, and its probably not to favorable about me...

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  • 3 months later...

Here's another hitch hiker I found today while doing a water change in one of my new cycling tanks. TDS 34 NH3 2ppm Temp 78

Needless to say I netted her and plopped her directly into another tank. (No Acclimation Required)!

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