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What all do Shrimp need to molt successfully?


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And while we are on the topic, what do all inverts (snails, crabs, etc) need to keep their shells/exoskeleton in top shape?

 

I've never seen a laid out list specifying what inverts need to remain healthy, so thought I'd ask to ensure proper care.

 

Besides meeting the basic care water parameters/chemistry of the given species, pH, GH, KH, TDS, and temperature, what else is necessary?

 

So I know calcium is needed, but how much is enough, too little (failed molts) or too much (I've heard shrimp will be crushed from the inside)? I know GH measurements can detect calcium, but it's not just measuring calcium so you don't completely know the amounts of calcium. Just add or decrease by visual inspection? What signs are present before it's "too late" (shrimp dies/is dying)? I know you can add cuttle bone or limestone.

 

I've also heard shrimp need proper Magnesium levels, is that measured in GH as well? Although I think this is rarely a issue.

 

I've heard many people adding Iodine/Iodide to the water to help shrimp molt properly. How exactly does this work? Is this measured/detected in KH or GH? Not everyone uses or needs this it seems, so where are good "naturally" derived sources for those that don't require this supplemented? I assume the food, but is it also in the water? What is a good level/concentration? I want to keep shrimp in planted tanks (with dosing full assortment of dry fertilizers, NPK and CSM+B), is the potassium and sodium found in those enough iodide?

 

I've heard those mineral stone products out there are not necessary if you can keep the PH/GH/KH/TDS are the required levels.

 

I suppose a varied, well balanced diet (primarily consisting of vegetable matter for shrimp) helps provide the necessary nutrients/minerals. And I am sure natural producing microorganism/microinvert food sources, such as cholla wood, Indian Almond Leaves, Alder cones, driftwood, etc., are very helpful as well, among the other health benefits tannin sources bring.

 

But any other necessary mineral/vitamin supplements?

 

Sorry for all the questions. just want to make sure I have all the necessary information to successfully keep inverts alive and healthy.

 

 

 

By the way, I heard shrimp are really sensitive to larger water changes (40-75%), but then again I hear some do larger water changes with no ill effects, so what gives? Are shrimp really that sensitive (I can understand caridinas being sensitive/less hardy, especially highly inbred ones)? Or are they hardy and just maybe the ones experiencing negative impacts are because the shrimp are in poor health with regards to missing a key component of their needs mentioned above? I am solely talking about the percentage of water changed, with temp, PH, GH, KH, TDS all remaining the same.

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it is too long to read it and give a proper answer :P busy with work.

 

i can give you a quick answer to your last quesiton about water change.

 

i do most of the time a water change of 40 a 50 % with all my shrimp tanks (taiwan bee, prl, fire shrimp, so on.)

i get told by people 10000000000000000000000000000000000000x times: ooooo watch out you are going to kill your shrimp, they cant handle a big water change............ BULLSH** 

 

all big breeders i know in my hometown/country, they do the same as me a relative big water change and never lost a single shrimp!

it is those small ´just started´ breeders who say a big water change is harmfull.........

 

i can tell you i do every week at least 40% water change and have 10+  berried female´s walking with taiwan bee and 40+ with neo shrimps! i have a big baby boom in my tanks.... need to sell some soon :P

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The short answer is.... you're over thinking this whole thing. From the years I been keeping shrimp I find that staying simple works wonders in my tanks.

So I meet the basic needs ph, gh, kh. Then I just stick with a schedule of light feeding and regular top off with RO water.

Find what works best for YOU and once you do then repeat that process and that's it. We all do things a little different so honestly the best results will come from personal experience over time.

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it is too long to read it and give a proper answer :P busy with work.

 

i can give you a quick answer to your last quesiton about water change.

 

i do most of the time a water change of 40 a 50 % with all my shrimp tanks (taiwan bee, prl, fire shrimp, so on.)

i get told by people 10000000000000000000000000000000000000x times: ooooo watch out you are going to kill your shrimp, they cant handle a big water change............ BULLSH** 

 

all big breeders i know in my hometown/country, they do the same as me a relative big water change and never lost a single shrimp!

it is those small ´just started´ breeders who say a big water change is harmfull.........

 

i can tell you i do every week at least 40% water change and have 10+  berried female´s walking with taiwan bee and 40+ with neo shrimps! i have a big baby boom in my tanks.... need to sell some soon :P

 

It ultimately depends on differences between new water and tank water.

 

If your new water and tank water is nearly identical, a big water change such as 40-50% obviously won't do harm to your shrimp.

 

If your new water and tank water has different pH, temperature, big TDS difference, you would be stressing them out with every 40-50% water change.

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We are not scientist, just hobbyist and breeder.

 

so for cheap shrimp, I use DIY solution, just keep Ca:Mg to 4:1 ratio. with all the success. 

 

for expensive shrimp, I use commercial product, as SaltyShrimp Bee GH+, I keep all my bee shrimp with RO water and remineralize by SS GH+.

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It ultimately depends on differences between new water and tank water.

 

If your new water and tank water is nearly identical, a big water change such as 40-50% obviously won't do harm to your shrimp.

 

If your new water and tank water has different pH, temperature, big TDS difference, you would be stressing them out with every 40-50% water change.

Beside PH, Temp and TDS there is also another factor which is, how fast the new water was added.

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Beside PH, Temp and TDS there is also another factor which is, how fast the new water was added.

And that.

 

If everything is almost identical, you can just pour new water in.

 

If different, it's best to use airline to siphon new water in.

 

 

As people say, stable water parameters is key.

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The short answer is.... you're over thinking this whole thing. From the years I been keeping shrimp I find that staying simple works wonders in my tanks.

So I meet the basic needs ph, gh, kh. Then I just stick with a schedule of light feeding and regular top off with RO water.

Find what works best for YOU and once you do then repeat that process and that's it. We all do things a little different so honestly the best results will come from personal experience over time.

No water changes ?

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it is too long to read it and give a proper answer :P busy with work.

 

i can give you a quick answer to your last quesiton about water change.

 

i do most of the time a water change of 40 a 50 % with all my shrimp tanks (taiwan bee, prl, fire shrimp, so on.)

i get told by people 10000000000000000000000000000000000000x times: ooooo watch out you are going to kill your shrimp, they cant handle a big water change............ BULLSH** 

 

all big breeders i know in my hometown/country, they do the same as me a relative big water change and never lost a single shrimp!

it is those small ´just started´ breeders who say a big water change is harmfull.........

 

i can tell you i do every week at least 40% water change and have 10+  berried female´s walking with taiwan bee and 40+ with neo shrimps! i have a big baby boom in my tanks.... need to sell some soon :P

I'm not a breeder per-se but my shrimp breed .  I have had shrimp in heavy planted tanks for roughly 3 years so no expert .

 

I have very good water here but I have found that 10 % to 20 % water change to be safe plus shrimp thrive .

I have had a death here and there with 40 % changes . I find that a big change in water chemistry, temp for them.

 

I do de-chlorinate water prior and it comes directly from tap .

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I do use 100% reversed osmosewater with identical parameters 3 celcuis colder thats the key to succes for me a relative big water change helps my shrimp with molting

Everybody has his own methode and own succes experience.... so yeah experience and see what is the best for ya

So every time you do water change you shrimp molt including the berried ones you mentioned earlier?

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The short answer is.... you're over thinking this whole thing. From the years I been keeping shrimp I find that staying simple works wonders in my tanks.

So I meet the basic needs ph, gh, kh. Then I just stick with a schedule of light feeding and regular top off with RO water.

Find what works best for YOU and once you do then repeat that process and that's it. We all do things a little different so honestly the best results will come from personal experience over time.

Def agree you are over thinking it, alot of people tend to worry too much about the small details. If your shrimp are alive and you meet the basic requirements they will molt Breed and multiply. Additives, chemicals are a waste of time they don't have it in the wild no use for it in the tank.

Water changes is how you keep the stuff in the water rhey need.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've been keeping shrimp for a while now. I've done weekly water changes and check parameters, but now I only top off with mineralized ro water and wc once a month (fill up a water bottle) probably not even 10%.

Still breeding and molting.

Sent from my SM-G925V using Tapatalk

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Don't use remin ro to top off. Only pure ro.

As the water evaporates, the minerals are left behind. ;)

Second that, if you don't believe simple test. Test TDS before and after using remineralized water. You'll see a huge jump...
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